Are you an early bird shopper?  Click here now and check out the Simply Canning gift guide. 

Canning Venison, Hot Pack

canning venison hot pack

Canning venison is so easy I wish I had started years ago. These directions will work with beef, elk, or pork as well. 

I will NOT go into how to butcher your deer. If you would like instructions on how to do that check with your county extension they may have ideas for you. 

If you have your meat butchered commercially, check with your butcher and let them know how much of it you would like cubed. Or just have it processed into roasts. See if you save on processing costs by cutting it up yourself. 

Great Venison Cooking has some tutorials on processing your deer.

The page has instruction for canning venison with a  hot pack.  This simply means it is cooked before filling your jars.  If you like a raw pack, check out this page.  Remember raw pack does not mean not processed.  The pack method is simply referring to how you fill your jars.  Any packing method MUST be pressure canned  

The first time I tried canning venison I could not believe it was so easy. I thought surely there was something I am missing.  Nope, nothing missing. Our meat tasted great!

My husband and sons butcher our deer with me helping as a wrapper, canner and freezer. Jerky is a team effort. My husband and I make it the boys eat it.

For us, doing it ourselves saves on costs and we know just what we are getting and how our meat is handled.   Any meat must always be processed in a pressure canner.




Your shelves are full of canning jars with ground or cubed elk.... what do you do with it? Make supper of course!

Click here for information on cooking with home canned wild meats.

Prepare

Gather your canning supplies

Procedure

    Cut away any bruised areas, gristle, and excess fat. Slice across the grain into strips about 1 inch thick. Then slice these strips into cubes.  Place cubes in a large pan and brown.  Doing this in batches is the best.  Save any broth that is created. 

    Add canning salt to your jars if desired. I use 1 tsp per quart. I have seen it recommended to use 2 tsp. Add according to your taste. 

    Once your meat is heated through, fill into hot jars. Use a slotted spoon and leave the drippings in the pan. After you have the jars full pour any meat drippings over the meat in the jars.

    There will probably not be enough juices to cover all the jars. Evenly distribute the juice you have between the jars and then top them off with boiling water. Leave a 1 inch head space.

My kids all help in processing our meat.
Use a heavy pan to brown your meat.
If you don't have enough broth, top off your jars with boiling wager.

    Wipe the rims of your jars clean.  This is important so that any grease or food will not interfere with the lid sealing to the jar.  Place the warmed lids and screw bands on finger tight. Finally place jars in your preheated pressure canner.

    Follow pressure canning instructions using the processing time below. 

    Don't forget to adjust the pressure requirements for your elevation.

Process

    Process Quarts 1 hour 30 minutes
    Process Pints 1 hour 15 minutes
Adjustments for Pressure Canner
Altitude in Feet Dial Gauge Canner Weighted Gauge Canner
0-1000 11 10
1001-2000 11 15
2001-4000 12 15
4001-6000 13 15
6001-8000 14 15
8000-10,000 15 15

Related Pages

› Canning Venison Hot Pack

Canning Books by Sharon

New! Comments

Leave me a comment in the box below.